Comfy Chair! locations, fantasy & screwball

This week fetch the Comfy Chair for a blog that gives you some amazing movie location tours, and some other fun things for your consideration…Dear Old Hollywood is always fun, and especially so this week with the latest post on the Gun Crazy locations. Start there then stay with your guide for many fun and engrossing “then–and-now” looks by Robby, who recently contributed a great piece on Double Indemnity to the last big special issue of The Dark Pages.

Explanation of “comfy chair” in this post – please click the “COMFY CHAIR” TAG to see all the great past occupants.

Have another look at this cool illustration that I reblogged on my tumblr last week:  (not mine! <–link takes you to the source)

besides being an amazing drawing, what a concept! Thinking along these lines, use the time machine to cast anyone from any era in any movie, as any character, what’s your idea of the greatest classic movie never made, or even alternate casting that you think would improve some classics? Sticking with superheroes, I always thought an older Robert Taylor would make the best Batman, at least that’s the first actor I think of when I look at Alex Ross’ Batman. Kent Smith would’ve made a neat Superman, but even better would’ve been Jeffrey Hunter. Chuck Connors as Hawkman. Paul Lukas would’ve been a great Dracula.

TCM this week:

I recommend Wednesday Randolph Scott western day ! Yes all of them.

Or, for those of limited time, different taste, or any taste at all, the 2 Irene Dunne pictures Together Again (11:15pm Monday –Tonight!) which I haven’t seen yet but is bound to be good, and Theodora Goes Wild (1am Tuesday) which I have seen and you must because it’s fabulous. Dunne plays a Sunday school teacher from a small town, who, unbeknownst to anyone is actually the author, under a pseudonym, of a racy, scandalous novel titled The Sinner, which has been running in installments  in the local paper. Melvyn Douglas is the commercial cover artist with whom Dunne does the obligatory romantic “dance/chase” which involves Douglas posing as a gardener in Lynnfield, and returning to New York where Dunne follows him to serve up a nice juicy scandal to help him get out of an unhappy marriage. After more than 5 years of weepy women’s dramas, epics, romances, and musicals, all of which Dunne did beautifully, Theodora Goes Wild was her first big screwball comedy, and as such surprised many critics, while also defining and boosting her career. It was a genre in which she would further improve and handily make her own in a way distinct from the other comedy queens like Carole Lombard, and Theodora shows how she did so. Dunne strikes the most perfect balance between being a nutty but grounded screwball comedienne, intelligent but with a great capacity for being ridiculous, especially when it’s meant to skewer and spoof both herself and conventions meant to keep her reigned in. She’s zany like a fox, always for a purpose and just at the right moments, and only “playing” the naïve small town lady with a knowing wink. And as a bonus she sings! Another figure for whom Theodora was a comedy “first” was director Richard Boleslawski, who kept the farcical events going at a great steady pace with lots of laughs and a few homages to his fellow native Soviet filmmakers thrown in, because, what would a comedy be without those?

Feel free to leave your pick(s) for the week

About Kristina Dijan

Classic movie fan with a blog.
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2 Responses to Comfy Chair! locations, fantasy & screwball

  1. Together Again is a fun movie. Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer had great chemistry. The supporting players, including Charles Coburn and Mona Freeman are terrific.

    Like this

  2. kristina says:

    hey there, got it dvrd last nite & looking forward to watching ! Charles Coburn is great fun, am never disappointed by Irene Dunne to be honest & always happy to see a “new” one of hers. thanks !

    Like this

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